Introducing LGPSI, a guide for the uncertain

LGPSI, also known as Lingua Graeca Per Se Illustrata, and by its Greek name ἡ ἑλληνικὴ γλῶσσα καθ’ αὑτὴν φωτιζονένη, is an expansive writing project aimed at producing a new type of Greek reading text built for learners of ancient Greek.

It takes its name from the famous Lingua Latina per se Illustrata of Hans Ørberg. And, to some extent is designed to be a Greek edition of that, though with important differences.

The project consists of several elements:

The core text: The core text is main material of continuous Greek text which follows, at its centre, the story of a family in Antioch in the 4th century A.D., and those they met along the way. This material is being primarily authored by myself. The chapters are designed to become increasingly more complex in style, vocabulary, and grammar.

 

FAQ:

How can I get hold of LGPSI?

 

You can find LGPSI available online at:

This page lets you access the raw source files, and if you’re familiar with github, you can create issues/submit feedback directly:

https://github.com/seumasjeltzz/LinguaeGraecaePerSeIllustrata

This page lets you read the text in a html format, or access a script-generated pdf. These two versions are updated slightly less often, so corrections take longer to appear here.

https://seumasjeltzz.github.io/LinguaeGraecaePerSeIllustrata/

 

Does it cost anything?

LGPSI is an open-access resource and you can freely access it and put it to use basically however you see fit. No, you don’t need to send me money. Yes, you can if you would like.

There may come a stage where some instantiation of LGPSI costs money (e.g., a print version). But my commitment is that LGPSI should be both open in the sense of ‘free to collaborate and improve’, but also ‘free to use without cost’.

What if I don’t know any Greek?

Unlike LLPSI where it really is possible to open up the first page, provided you know the Roman alphabet, LGPSI is not *quite* so adaptable. For this reason, I have in mind a couple of features. Firstly, chapter 1 follows LLPSI capitulum primum quite closely. If you know the Latin, you should be able to understand how the Greek parallels that. Secondly, what about the alphabet?

What if I don’t know the Greek alphabet?

I have in mind to produce a ‘chapter zero’ resource that should orient total ab initio beginners. In particular, teaching the alphabet through aural/visual repetition of characters, using minimal pairs and working up to words. It should then be possible to reproduce the audio side of this for several different pronunciation schemes/periods?

What kind of Greek does LGPSI teach?

LGPSI at present teaches ‘Koine Greek with Attic sprinkles’. It does this for several reasons. Firstly, the vast bulk of ancient Greek literature is written in Koine. Students who study Koine are well situated to access this material. Secondly, for those whose interest is primarily biblical and related studies, Koine is the idiom of primary interest. Thirdly, a significant portion of Koine writers deliberately and conscientiously employ a high-register of Koine that contains Attic features, for which reason you will find plenty of Attic influence in this text. Fourthly, the historical setting of the main storyline is late antiquity. I believe that students whose main interest is “classical literature” and “classical Greek” will still be well served by this text.

That said, I do have in mind that LGPSI as a broader project of multiple stories may, indeed should, grow to include spin-off texts that may focus on specific authors/dialects/periods. That would include a ‘high Attic’, a Homeric book, a Byzantine one, and other possibilities.

Where are the margin notes and illustrations like LLPSI?

I haven’t done them yet. But they are envisaged. Writing LLPSI was Ørberg’s life work, and LGPSI is a work in progress with zero funding. So what you get to see and use now is very much LGPSI as I’m literally writing it. That has two main consequences: (a) the text is somewhat ‘unstable’ as I will undoubtedly refine and revise it; (b) my primary concern at present is producing the core text.

However, (c) those elements are in my mind. In particular I am keenly interested in how marginal notes/footnotes/images/etc., may be incorporated at a digitally rich level, so that they are dynamically featured, not clued and tied to “chapter X, line 123”.

Also, to have illustrations we will need an illustrator.

I found a mistake

Please tell me. I love and appreciate feedback. I am usually able to incorporate revisions in a very short turn-around. Whether what you’ve spotted is a typo, or a systematic error on my part, I want to hear about it.

I think you could improve X, Y, Z.

Similarly, I am appreciative of broader feedback. I test this material out on students as I can, but the more feedback I have about all sorts of elements, the better we can make this for all.

Do you have any connection to the Cultura Classica LGPSI?

No, I don’t personally. I have some familiarity with Cultura Classica, but only from the outside.

Spin-Off projects

At present, two people have started spin-off projects that dovetail with LGPSI material:

Eric Sowell has a spin-off project ὁ ἑταῖρος https://mallioch.github.io/hetairos/

Fletcher Hardison is working on some Grammar (in Greek) and Exercises to accompany the material: see https://amindforlanguage.com/lgpsi-melethma/

Contact Details:

You can contact me about LGPSI at thepatrologist@gmail.com

If you want to tweet about LGPSI, #LGPSI is our tag

 

3 responses

  1. This is a bold, imaginative undertaking full of tremendous potential. I’m excited about this initiative. Kudos!

  2. I’ve started using LLPSI for Latin. That led to searching for natural method Ancient Greek. And here I am reading the opening sentences of LGPSI, and, oh my gosh, I’m in love. Thank you!

    • PS I realize LGPSI is Koine, but I’m just so delighted with it I’m happy to delay my Ancient Greek aspirations.

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